"In the Beginning, all America was Virginia."
William Byrd II
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Past research fellowships

View a list of past research fellowship

2014

2014

  • Lindsay Bloch, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • for research on production, trade, and consumption of pottery in the Chesapeake region during the eighteenth century.
  • Kristin Brill, Ph.D. of Aberystwyth University • for research on planter women's fashioning of a language of dissent to the Confederate state during the Civil War.
  • Christian Carr, Ph.D. of the Savannah College of Art and Design • for research on Indiana Fletcher Williams (1828–1900) of Sweet Briar, Virginia.   
  • Elizabeth Cook, of the College of William and Mary • for research on labor and the built environment in Richmond, Virginia, from the 1730s through the nineteenth century.
  • Matthew Costello, of Marquette University • for research on the deification of George Washington's physical body, the veneration of relics associated with Washington, and conflicts over his estate and grave.
  • Ben Davidson, of New York University • for research on the lives of children who grew up at the time of the Civil War.
  • Michael Douma, Ph.D. of James Madison University • for research on the cultural significance of rock inscriptions within caves in the Shenandoah Valley.
  • Alexandra Finley, of the College of William and Mary • for research on the role of banking institutions on nineteenth-century slave traders' operations.
  • Christopher Florio, of Princeton University • for research on how the problem of poverty intertwined with the "age of emancipation" in the nineteenth century.
  • Sarah Gardner, Ph.D. of Mercer University • for research on reading choices, habits, and practices of southerners in the Civil War era
  • Robert Glaze, of the University of Tennessee • for research on southerners' perceptions of the Army of Tennessee from 1861 to 1930.
  • Jordan Grant, of American University • for research on slave-catchers—people and institutions that sought, captured, and returned fugitive slaves to their legal owners for a reward.
  • Julian M. Hayter, Ph.D. of the University of Richmond • for consultation and commentary in conjunction with the Virginia Historical Society’s Created Equal film series.
  • Sheri Huerta, of George Mason University • for research on the social and economic causes for and results of the destabilization of slavery in northern Virginia.
  • Evan Kutzler, of the University of South Carolina • for research on the captivity experience and Civil War prisons through the lens of environmental and sensory history.
  • Laura Mammina, of the University of Alabama • for research on interactions between Union soldiers and southern women during the Civil War.
  • Sarah McCartney, of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro • for research on community and commerce in the Greenbrier River Valley in present-day West Virginia, and the creation of identity during the American Revolution.
  • Travis McDonald, of Thomas Jefferson's Poplar Forest • for research on construction trades craftsmen, free and enslaved, in Virginia during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. 
  • Amanda Milian, of Texas Christian University • for research on Washington, D.C., society and presidential dining from 1790 to 1840.
  • Brian Miller, Ph.D. of Emporia State University • for research on the United Confederate Veterans organization.
  • Nathaniel Millett, Ph.D. of Saint Louis University • for research on the impact of Afro-Indian relations on the English empire in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
  • A. Skye Montgomery, of the University of Oxford • for research on the intersection of family and nation in the discourses of the South during the Civil War era.
  • Daniel Peart, Ph.D. of Queen Mary University of London • for research on how nineteenth-century protectionist and free trade activists promoted conflicting visions of national economy by exploiting the democratic potential of the U.S. political system.
  • Andrew Perchard, Ph.D. of the University of Strathclyde • for research on the Reynolds Metals Company and the global aluminum industry.
  • Ryan Poe, of Duke University • for research on the changing dynamic between property, power, and the law in Reconstruction Richmond.
  • Daniel Robinson, of Cambridge University • for research on colonial American attitudes toward European international relations and British foreign policy in the late seventeenth century and eighteenth century.
  • Katherine E. Rohrer, of the University of Georgia • for research on elite and/or educated southern women and their embrace of religion in public and private settings between 1830 and 1930.
  • Robert Sidwell, of Kent State University • for research on the wartime and postbellum careers of Robert E. Lee's personal staff officers.
  • David Silkenat, Ph.D. of the University of Edinburgh • for research on the anomalous place of surrender during the Civil War, and how Americans during the Civil War era understood surrender.
  • John H. Spiers, Ph.D. of Boston College • for research on how different places in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area addressed the impact of growth and development as the key to environmental protection during the late twentieth century.
  • Kristin Tremper, of Lehigh University • for research on how social authorities engaged in public discourses of death to gain public trust, social influence, and professional respectability.
  • Michael Trotti, Ph.D. of Ithaca College • for research on capital punishment in the South during the era of lynching.
  • Rachel Walker, of the University of Maryland • for research on the fraught connection between beauty and intelligence in the post-Enlightenment era.
  • Andrew Wegmann, of Louisiana State University • for research on the development of the term "mulatto," and the social, cultural, religious, legal, and scientific definitions thereof, from 1718 to 1862.
  • Holly Stevens White, of the College of William and Mary • for research on adolescence in the early republican South.
  • Jonathan White, Ph.D. of Christopher Newport University • for research on what sleep and dreams meant to Civil War–era Americans.
  • Emily Williams, of the University of Leicester • for research on Couper Marble Works, of Norfolk, Virginia, and democratization of the tombstone industry.
  • Jamie Wilson, of the University of South Carolina • for research on the ways that the European travel experiences of influential southern authors, educators, and sociopolitical leaders intensified their proslavery beliefs.  
  • Claire Wolnisty, of the University of Kansas • for research on the role of Latin America in southerners' understandings of global relationships, in both the antebellum and postbellum eras.
  • Adam Zucconi, of West Virginia University • for research on how residents in antebellum northwestern Virginia interpreted the politics of slavery.

2013

2013

  • Thomas J. Balcerski of Cornell University • for research on political culture of the antebellum period with an emphasis on the importance of political friendships and alliances in the outcome of the disunion and the Civil War.
  • Richard Bell, Ph.D. of the University of Maryland • for research on Patty Cannon who kidnapped free black people and sold them into slavery in Mississippi in the 1810s and 1820s.
  • Mark Boonshoft of Ohio State University • for research on the role of education in the construction of a regional social order in Upper South and mid-Atlantic from 1740 to 1820.
  • Adrian Brettle of the University of Virginia • for research on Confederate expansionist ambitions during the Civil War, 1861–65.
  • Kristina Downs of Indiana University • for research on representations of Native American women, including the portrayal of Pocahontas who has taken on the characteristics of a folk heroine.   
  • Christopher Farrish of Claremont Graduate University • for research on race, gender, and labor in the plantation culinary sphere, 1850–80.
  • Kathleen Hilliard, Ph.D. of Iowa State University • for research on the transformation of the slaves' internal economy during the Civil War and emancipation.
  • Brady L. Holley of Mississippi State University • for research on American junior officers in the Mexican War.
  • Benjamin H. Irvin, Ph.D. of the University of Arizona • for research on disability, masculinity, and citizenship among Virginia's Revolutionary War veterans.
  • Christopher C. Jones of the College of William and Mary • for research on the relationship between the American Revolution and evangelical religion.
  • David Komline of the University of Notre Dame • for research on how Americans came to put faith in public education.
  • Matthew Kruer of the University of Pennsylvania • for research on the connections between Indian nations, English traders, and the outbreak of both interethnic warfare and colonial rebellion during Bacon's Rebellion.
  • Peter Libero of the University of Maryland • for research on the development of grassroots conservatism in Virginia during the 1970s and 1980s.
  • Alan Libert, Ph.D. of the University of Newcastle • for research on culinary anthroponyms and toponyms as indicators of Virginian identity and historical consciousness.
  • Christopher J. Lukasik, Ph.D. of Purdue University • for research on the rise of literary illustration in nineteenth-century America.
  • Brian P. Luskey, Ph.D. of West Virginia University • for research on soldiers and the culture of capitalism during the Civil War.
  • Maurice Melton, Ph.D. of Albany State University • for research on African American pilots in the Southern maritime trade, 1640–1875.
  • Barton A. Myers, Ph.D. of Texas Tech University • for research on soldiers and atrocity in  Civil War America.
  • Jack Noe of the University of Leeds • for research on American nationalism in the post–Civil War American South with a particular focus on the Centennial of 1876.
  • Nicholas Pellegrino of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas • for research on the trans-Atlantic Catholic influence on American ideas of religious freedom.
  • Andrew Perchard, Ph.D. of the University of Strathclyde • for research on the Reynolds Metals Company and the global aluminum industry.
  • Keith Pluymers of the University of Southern California • for research on how English people understood and used land in southwest Ireland, Virginia, and Bermuda, c. 1580–1640.
  • Anne C. Reilly of the University of Delaware • for research on public commemorations of historic anniversaries in the early twentieth century and the role of memorial landscapes in shaping American ideas of national identity.
  • John P. Riley of Binghamton University • for research on fatherhood and the family in Victorian America.
  • Evan C. Rothera of Pennsylvania State University • for research on the post–Civil War experience of Thomas Jefferson Page, a Confederate officer who left the United States and went to Argentina after the Civil War.
  • Rachel A. Shelden, Ph.D. of Georgia College and State University • for research on judicial ethics and the U.S. Supreme Court in the long nineteenth century.
  • Sylvie Smoczek of the Université Paris VIII Vincennes Saint-Denis • for research on the emergence of a Southern sentiment, 1787–1820.
  • Terri L. Snyder, Ph.D. of California State University, Fullerton • for research on free African American women and the law in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Virginia.
  • Marie Stango of the University of Michigan • for research on the antislavery colonies, Sierra Leone and Liberia, from 1780–1860.
  • Lauren K. Thompson of Florida State University • for research on fraternization between Union and Confederate soldiers throughout the Civil War.
  • Jordan Watkins of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas • for research on the emergence of historical awareness in the antebellum period.
  • Kelly B. Weber of Rice University • for research on the development of daughterhood as a political identity after the Civil War.
  • Christopher Willoughby of Tulane University • for research on how physicians understood race and treated African Americans in the antebellum United States.

2012

2012

  • Marise Bachand, Ph.D. of Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières • for research on plantation women and the urban south, 1790-1877.
  • Jill Baskin of the University of Virginia • for research on the visual culture of African Americans in Liberia, 1821-1865.
  • Megan Bever of the University of Alabama • for research on drinking and temperance in the American Civil War era.
  • Adrian Brettle of the University of Virginia • for research on Confederate expansionist ambitions during the American Civil War.
  • Josh Canale of Binghamton University • for research on Virginia's revolutionary era executive bodies.
  • Abigail Cooper of the University of Pennsylvania • for research on Civil War slave refugee or contraband camps.
  • T. Clay Cooper of the University of Florida • for research on masculinity in the nineteenth-century South.
  • Christopher Curtis, Ph.D. of Claflin University • for research on the legal reconstruction of church property rights.
  • Adam Domby of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill • for research on neighbor conflicts in Loudoun County during the Civil War.
  • Shannon Eaves of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill • for research on the impact of sexual exploitation on enslaved women and the greater antebellum South.
  • Nicole Etcheson, Ph.D. of Ball State University • for research on Confederate, African American, and woman suffrage.
  • Max Grivno, Ph.D. of the University of Southern Mississippi • for research on plantation society in Virginia and Mississippi.
  • Matt Hall of the University of Florida • for research on how southerners used electricity in the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to create the contemporary urban South.
  • Délide Joseph of Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales • for research on the formation of the Haitian state and its migratory policy concerning African Americans from the United States, Caribbean blacks, and American Indians.
  • Matthew Karp, Ph.D. of Rowan University • for research on American slaveholding attitudes about foreign affairs across the antebellum and Civil War eras.
  • Philippa Koch of the University of Chicago • for research on religion and medicine in eighteenth-century America.
  • Alix Lerner of Princeton University • for research on aging slaves in the Old South.
  • Joshua Lynn of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill • for research on the political ideology and culture of the Democratic party before the Civil War.
  • Spencer McBride of Louisiana State University • for research on clergymen during the Revolution and Early Republic.
  • Kent McConnell, Ph.D. of Phillips Exeter Academy • for research on religious attitudes and practices during the Civil War.
  • D. Todd Miller of the University of North Carolina, Greensboro • for research on the formation of British and American identity in the colonial Chesapeake region.
  • Elizabeth Brand Monroe, Ph.D. of Indiana University at Indianapolis • for research on William Wirt, U.S. Attorney General, 1817-1829, and his early career as a lawyer.
  • Kenneth Morgan, Ph.D. of Brunel University • for research on Hugh Perry Keane and Saint Vincent's Irish planters.
  • Jason Phillips, Ph.D. of Mississippi State University • for research on how Americans anticipated the Civil War.
  • Shari Rabin of Yale University • for research on American Jewish life and community, 1820-1877.
  • Amber Surmiller of Texas Christian University • for research on the planters in Virginia, focusing on the Roger Jones family.
  • Gregory Urwin, Ph.D. of Temple University • for research on a social history of Lord Cornwallis's 1781 Virginia campaign.
  • John Zaborney, Ph.D. of the University of Maine at Presque Isle • for research on non-elite white southerners.

2011

2011

  • Matthew Amato of the University of Southern California • for research on photographic images and image-practices in the cultures of slavery, antislavery, and post-emancipation America
  • Michael Bennett of High Point University • for research on the forces that restrained and then facilitated lawful and unlawful killing during the Civil War
  • Michael Bernath of the University of Miami • for research on the role of northern teachers and tutors in the Old South, 1790–1860
  • Charles Bodie, president of the Rockbridge Historical Society • for research on James McDowell (1795–1851), a Virginia governor and U.S. congressman
  • Michael Conlin of Eastern Washington University • for research on sectional identity in the political struggle over slavery in the antebellum era
  • Natalie Deibel of George Washington University • for research on the role sports, games, and other pastimes played in the lives of women and the formation of gender roles from 1600 to 1800
  • Zachary Dresser of Rice University • for research on religious thought in the postwar South
  • Bartow Elmore of the University of Virginia • for research on an environmental history of Coca-Cola
  • Allison Fredette of the University of Florida • for research on gender, regional identity, and the law in the border South, 1840–80
  • Claire Gherini of Johns Hopkins University • for research on the cultures and economies of health and healing between 1730 and 1800
  • Trenton (Cole) Jones of Johns Hopkins University • for research on prisoners of war and the American military culture during the Revolutionary War
  • Lindsay Keiter of the College of William and Mary • for research on changes in courtship and marriage in British North America between the 1750s and the Civil War
  • Cindy Kierner of George Mason University • for research on the 1811 Richmond Theatre fire
  • Andrew Lang of Rice University • for research on garrison, occupation, and home guard military service during the Civil War
  • Janet Lindman of Rowan University • for research on friendship in early America
  • Jessica Linker of the University of Connecticut • for research on female naturalists in early America between 1720 and 1860
  • Allison Madar of Rice University • for research on the role and importance of indentured servants in eighteenth-century Virginia
  • Ashley Mays of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill • for research on Confederate widows and grief in the postwar South
  • Matt McCook of Oklahoma Christian University • for research on the Second Great Awakening
  • Michelle Orihel of Southern Utah University • for research on the Virginia democratic movement and its reception in the late eighteenth century
  • Robert Owens of Wichita State University • for research on the role of mediators, both Indian and white, who tried to keep the peace on the Trans-Appalachian frontier in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries
  • Traci Parker of the University of Chicago • for research on African American saleswomen in department stores in the post–World War II era
  • James Rice of SUNY, Plattsburgh • for research on Bacon's Rebellion
  • Dorothy Spencer Rivera of the University of Maryland • for research on the social significance of childrearing in the British-American colonies
  • Catherine Saunders of George Mason University • for research on the influence of Emily Clemens Pearson's year at Mount Airy on her abolitionist fiction
  • Samantha Seeley of New York University • for research on mobility, citizenship, and freedom in the Early Republic
  • Blair Smith of the University of Dundee • for research on social hierarchy in Kentucky from the early 1770s to 1800
  • Matthew Spooner of Columbia University • for research on the reconstruction of southern slavery, 1778–1808
  • Colin Stephenson of Ohio State University • for research on the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions of 1798
  • Albert Tillson of the University of Tampa • for research on maritime workers in Revolutionary and antebellum Virginia
  • David Williard of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill • for research on the courses former Confederate soldiers took in attempting to reclaim control over their personal lives and sense of manhood
  • Michael Woods of the University of South Carolina • for research on the role of emotion in antebellum sectional politics and the coming of the Civil War
  • Ben Wright of Rice University • for research on early American antislavery clergy and their political inactions and actions
  • Christopher Young of Indiana University Northwest • for research on the relationship between foreign affairs, public opinion, and the American presidency during the 1790s

2010

2010

  • Kevin Arlyck of New York University • for research on federal courts and U.S. foreign relations in the Early Republic.
  • Ryan Bixby of University of Akron • for research on the socio-economic and environmental impact of the Civil War on Jefferson County of West Virginia.
  • Drew Bledsoe of Rice University • for research on the junior officers of the Confederate armies.
  • Kit Candlin of University of Sydney • for research on African Americans evacuated from New York by the British in 1783.
  • Christopher Capozzola of Massachusetts Institute of Technology • for research on people who lived of worked of and fought in the Philippines from 1898 to 1946.
  • Kevin Doyle of Brandeis University • for research on the gunpowder plot in early Virginia.
  • Lisa Freeman of University of Illinois of Chicago • for research on the Richmond Theatre fire of 1811.
  • Lars Holmstrom, public educator in Albemarle County • for research on the history and timeline of Gay Straight Alliance clubs (GSAs) in Virginia public schools
  • Charles Irons of Elon University • for research on the ecclesiastical decisions of African American southerners after emancipation.
  • Megan Ledford of University of Edinburgh • for research on the influence of Scottish Enlightenment ideals in Virginia.
  • Charlene Boyer Lewis of Kalamazoo College • for research on gardens and gardening in Virginia of 1750–1850.
  • Sarah Milov of Princeton University • for research on tobacco growers as intellectuals and political forces in North Carolina and Virginia.
  • Marie Molloy of University of Keele • for research on single white females in the nineteenth-century American South.
  • Brook Poston of Texas Christian University • for research on President James Monroe and how he viewed his political legacy.
  • Cathy Rex of University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire • for research on the imagery and lore of Pocahontas and the textual response of Anglo-American women writers.
  • Katy Simpson Smith of University of North Carolina of Chapel Hill • for research on a cross-cultural study of motherhood in the American South.
  • John Smolenski of University of California of Davis • for research on slave life at Landon Carter's Sabine Hill.
  • Susan Stearns of University of Chicago • for research on the role the Mississippi River played in the political economy of the United States before the Louisiana Purchase.
  • Albert Tillson of University of Tampa • for research on maritime workers in Revolutionary and antebellum Virginia.
  • T. J. Tomlin of University of Northern Colorado • for research on almanacs as they reflect and shape religious sensibility between 1730 and 1820.
  • Carlos Valencia Villa of Federal Fluminense University • for research on the internal economy of free blacks in Brazil and the United States.
  • Jennifer Marie Wagner of Brown University • for research on the architecture of Best Products Company stores.
  • Robert Wright of Augustana College • for research on for-profit businesses incorporated in the United States before the Civil War.

2009

2009

  • John Barr of Lone Star College • research on criticism of Abraham Lincoln from the Civil War to present day.
  • William (Steve) Belko of the University of West Florida • research on the life and contributions of statesman and jurist Philip Pendleton Barbour (1783-1841).
  • Evan Bennett of Florida Atlantic University • research on Virginia tobacco culture in the twentieth century.
  • Seth Bruggeman of Temple University • research on George Washington Parke Custis's contributions to the history of American public memory.
  • Thomas Chambers of Niagara University • research on the contrast between Virginians' enthusiastic reception of the Marquis de Lafayette during his 1824 tour and the relative lack of interest in remembering or commemorating the Yorktown battlefield.
  • James Davis of the State University of New York at Fredonia • research on music in the daily life of soldiers and civilians during winter quarters of 1863-1864 in central Virginia.
  • Kelley Deetz of the University of California at Berkeley • research on the experiences of plantation cooks as laborers, family members, and individuals in eighteenth and nineteenth century Virginia.
  • Radoslaw Dylewski of Adam Mickiewicz University • a linguistic comparison of Civil War letters written by less literate privates from Virginia and New England.
  • Christine Eisel of Bowling Green State University • research on gendered speech and punishment in colonial Virginia.
  • John Ellis of Purdue University • research on the impact of early Methodists' radically egalitarian message on youths who lived in the Upper South.
  • Daniel Flaherty of the University of Oklahoma • research on Chickasaw diplomacy with Virginia during the end of the American Revolution and as an ally to the Confederate States of America in the Civil War.
  • Shennette Garrett of the University of Texas, Austin • research on black entrepreneurs in insurance and banking in Virginia before World War II.
  • William Hardin of Vanderbilt University • research on the Pleasants v. Pleasants case of 1800 involving the manumission of slaves by a Quaker anti-slavery activist and member of the Tidewater merchant-planter elite.
  • Vanessa Holden of Rutgers University • research on the participation of African American women, enslaved and free, in Nat Turner's rebellion.
  • James Jewell of North Idaho College • research on the Battle of Manassas (Bull Run) and how the battle shaped the course of events.
  • Matthew Karp of the University of Pennsylvania • research on antebellum southern attitudes toward international affairs.
  • Deborah Lee, Ph.D. • research on Mary Lee (Fitzhugh) Custis and her involvement with the American Colonization Society.
  • Kay Wright Lewis of Rutgers University • research on the ideas of race war and extermination in antebellum America.
  • Whitney Martinko of the University of Virginia • research on the popular conceptions of progress and history in the United States by examining the ways in which Americans improved and preserved the landscape.
  • Kristine McCusker of Middle Tennessee State University • research on death rituals in the South, 1918-1945.
  • Benjamin Miller of the University of Florida • research on the construction of religious spaces by clergy in the Civil War era.
  • Paul Musselwhite of the College of William and Mary • research on the social and cultural significance of towns and cities in colonial Chesapeake society.
  • Daniel Peart of University College London • research on political action and political organization in the 1820s in the United States.
  • Robin Sager of Rice University • research on marital cruelty in antebellum Virginia, Texas, and Wisconsin.
  • Kendra Smith-Howard of the University of Albany, SUNY • research on the history of milk and dairy farming in the twentieth-century United States.
  • Thomas Strange of the University of Manchester • research on the role of the black preacher in the antebellum South.
  • Drew Swanson of the University of Georgia • research on the transition from dark leaf to bright leaf tobacco culture along the border of Virginia and North Carolina from 1840 to 1900.
  • Albert Tillson of the University of Tampa • research on watermen of Virginia's Chesapeake region during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
  • Nicole Myers Turner of the University of Pennsylvania • research on the role of black churches in shaping the politics of freed communities in post-emancipation Virginia.
  • Jennifer Van Horn of the University of Virginia • research on the ways that elite British colonists in North America used objects to create and maintain their civility.
  • Jamie Warren of Indiana University • research on the experiences and meaning of death on antebellum slave plantations of the Chesapeake and southern seaboard regions.
  • Angela Zombek of the University of Florida • research on the development and evolution of nineteenth-century punishment and imprisonment, placing particular emphasis on the Civil War's impact on institutions of confinement.

2008

2008

  • James Alsop of McMaster University • research on Dr. Gustavus R. B. Horner and the development of naval medicine, 1826–1868.
  • Friederike Baer of Temple University • research on Baroness Friederike Riedesel and the living conditions of captured German and British troops in Virginia during the Revolutionary War.
  • Kevin Barksdale of Marshall University • research on the Appalachian backcountry and the interactions that occurred across the region between Amerindian groups .
  • Audrey Bonnet of Université Paris • research on the different ways the Jamestown celebrations have been organized as well as the invention of myths and traditions, the function of collective memory and popular culture, and the role and influence of symbols.
  • Elizabeth Crosman of University of Delaware • research on the evolution of Methodist lay assertiveness by examining the separation of the Republican Methodists begun by James O'Kelly, evangelist Lorenzo Dow's controversial career, and the struggle for lay representation led by Nicholas Snethen.
  • Jessica Dallow of University of Alabama at Birmingham • research on sporting artist Edward Troye and his patrons, including William Ransom Johnson and John Minor Botts.
  • James Davis of State University of New York at Fredonia • research on music in the daily life of soldiers and civilians during winter quarters of 1863–64 in central Virginia.
  • Patricia Davis of University of California, San Diego • research on the various media involved in the construction of an emergent black southern identity centered on collective memories of slavery and the Civil War.
  • James Denham of Florida Southern College • research on William P. Duval, a Virginia native who served as territorial governor of Florida from 1822 to 1834.
  • Carol Emberton of University at Buffalo • research on how Virginia's Readjuster Party used the issue of corporal punishment, particularly the abolition of the whipping post, to galvanize a progressive, biracial coalition that made Virginia unique in Reconstruction politics.
  • Lynette Garrett of American University • research on Confederate nationalism.
  • Hilary Green of University of North Carolina • research on African American education during Reconstruction.
  • Catherine Kerrison of Villanova University • research on Martha Jefferson Randolph, Maria Jefferson Eppes, and Harriet Hemings, the three daughters of Thomas Jefferson.
  • Gabriel Klehr of Johns Hopkins University • research on the conversion of slaves to evangelical forms of Christianity from roughly 1770 to 1830.
  • Michael Krivdo of Texas A & M University • research on the 1862 battle of Drewry's Bluff.
  • Barbaranne Liakos of University of Iowa • research on American paintings and prints of Civil War battle scenes produced from 1869 through 1894, and in particular, those by John Adams Elder, an artist from Fredericksburg.
  • Jenny Masur of National Park Service Underground Railroad Network to Freedom • research on runaway slaves and northern Virginia slaveholding families and plantations.
  • Sarah McLennan of College of William and Mary • research on the Jamestown 350th Anniversary Celebration in 1957.
  • Elizabeth Monroe of Indiana University • research on William Wirt, U.S. Attorney General, 1817–29, and his early career as a lawyer.
  • Megan Nelson of California State University, Fullerton • research on how the ruins of war challenged fundamental aspects of nationalism from 1861 to 1865 and in the years after the conflict.
  • C. Scott Nesbit of University of Virginia • research on the ideas of public forgiveness and reconciliation during Reconstruction.
  • Yvette Piggush of Florida International University • research on American social romanticism, 1790–1840.
  • Justin Pope of George Washington University • research on slave insurrections, conspiracies, and religious movements between 1729 and 1742.
  • Matthew Rhoades of West Texas A&M University • research on Alexander Spotswood and the fiscal-military state in Virginia during the years 1710–22.
  • Laura Sandy of University of Reading • research on plantation overseers, with particular regard to the part they played in slave management during the American Revolution.
  • Rachel Shapiro of University of Virginia • research on the influence of community life in Washington, D.C., on the course of American political events leading up to the Civil War, 1846–1862.
  • Faren Siminoff of Nassau Community College, New York City • research on James Robert Lee, a free man of color who became an Adventist preacher in Long Island.
  • Chad Vanderford of University of Texas of the Permian Basin, Odessa • research on St. George Tucker, his sons, Henry and Beverley Tucker, and his grandson, John Randolph Tucker.
  • Annette Varcoe of Binghamton University • research on women's involvement in benevolent work during and after the Civil War.
  • Todd Wahlstrom of University of California, Santa Barbara • research on the economic and social history behind southern migration to Mexico after the Civil War.
  • Jennifer Weber of University of Kansas • research on the effect of the draft on both the United States and the Confederate States populations.
  • Jonathan Wells of University of North Carolina at Charlotte • research on the emergence and evolution of middle-class southerners in the post–Civil War period.

2007

2007

  • William S. Belko of the University of West Florida • research on the life and contributions of the noted American statesman and jurist Philip Pendleton Barbour (1783-1841).
  • Amanda Herbert Bilby of Johns Hopkins University • research on women's alliances in early modern Britain and America and the mechanics of female sociability.
  • David Brown of Manchester University • research on nonslaveholding whites on the eve of the Civil War.
  • Gary Bryant of the University of Houston • research on southern women entering the paid labor force during the Civil War.
  • Aaron Scott Crawford of the University of Tennessee • research on John Randolph of Roanoke from 1812 to 1833.
  • Kelley Deetz of the University of California at Berkeley • research on the effects of the domestic slave trade on the enslaved community at Bacon's Castle.
  • Chris Evans of the University of Glamorgan • research on the agricultural tools that were sent from Britain to the New World, focusing on the hoe, the mainstay of tobacco cultivation in the Chesapeake.
  • David Gleeson of the College of Charleston • research on Irish involvement with the Confederacy, with particular interest in the Keiley family papers.
  • Alejandro Gomez of Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales • research on the Haitian Revolution and the reaction of elite whites in Cuba, Jamaica, Venezuela, and Virginia.
  • Samuel Graber of the University of Iowa • research on how the divided American nation during the Civil War affected nationalist cultural constructions in Britain and America.
  • M. Keith Harris of the University of Virginia • research on Civil War veterans' efforts to articulate and perpetuate divisive memories of sectional conflict during the era conventionally treated as one of national reconciliation.
  • Warren R. Hofstra of Shenandoah University • a study of the wheat economy in the Shenandoah Valley.
  • Shona Johnston of Georgetown University • research on the role of Catholicism in the foundation and expansion of English interests in the Caribbean and mainland North America.
  • Brent Jones of the University of Virginia • research on how the diverse social, political, economic, and ecclesiastical circumstances of nineteenth-century southern Appalachia shaped religious structures and ideas differently in each state.
  • Catherine Jones of the University of South Carolina • research into how Virginia integrated the massive changes of emancipation and Confederate defeat into their intimate lives by examining the impact on black and white children.
  • Anthony Kaye of Penn State University • research on Nat Turner's rebellion in the context of Southampton County's neighborhood terrain.
  • Laura Keenan of the University of Pennsylvania • research on the origins and historical development of the Shawnees in the colonial Atlantic world.
  • Lauren LaFauci of the University of Michigan • research on the ways in which the power dynamics of southern slavery came to affect representations and experiences of the natural world by southerners.
  • Peter Leavenworth of the University of New Hampshire • research on the gradual Europeanization and secularization of American popular music in the early national period.
  • Stephen Marc of Arizona State University • research on how the black community was described and defined in the early part of the 20th century in textual and illustrated documents.
  • Christian McWhirter of the University of Alabama • research on the role of music during the Civil War.
  • Gregory Mixon of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte • research on black southern militias in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia during the period 1865-1910.
  • Ami Pfugrad-Jackisch of the University of Michigan, Flint • research on the role secret fraternal organizations played in the creation of white male unity and civic brotherhood in antebellum Virginia.
  • Sheila Phipps of Appalachian State University • research on male and female labor experiences during the Civil War.
  • Mark Quintanilla of Hannibal-LaGrange College • research on Michael Keane, an Irish colonist in the West Indies.
  • Angelita Reyes of Arizona State University • research on the African American Skipwiths of Prestwood after emancipation.
  • Katherine Rieder of Harvard University • research on the meanings embedded in a variety of colonial personal possessions.
  • Karen Ryder of the University of Delaware • research on slave insurance and the role of slavery in the development of early life, fire, and marine insurers.
  • Jewel Spangler of the University of Calgary • research on the Richmond theater fire in history and memory.
  • Patrick Spero of the University of Pennsylvania • research on Lord Dunmore's War and conflicts between Dunmore's militias and the Shawnees.
  • Russell Stoermer of the University of Virginia • research on the transformation of Anglo-Virginia politics in the period between the creation of the United Kingdom and the American Revolution.
  • Susan Vogel of Ruhr-Universitat Bochum • research on Mary Lee Custis.
  • Mark Wetherington of the Filson Historical Society • research on the lives and deaths of Col. Ephraim Elmer Ellsworth and James William Jackson.
  • Brian Wills of the University of Virginia's College at Wise • research on George Henry Thomas.
  • Andrew Witmer of the University of Virginia • research on African foreign missions and American conceptions of race during the nineteenth century.
  • Natalie Zacek of the University of Manchester • research on the development of thoroughbred horse breeding and racing in Virginia.
  • Albert Zambone of Purdue University North Central • research on the role of Anglican concepts of moderation played in forming Virginian concepts of moderation.

2006

2006

  • Matthew Mace Barbee of Bowling Green State University • research on the history and historical memory of Richmond's Monument Avenue from the end of the World War II through the unveiling of the Arthur Ashe Monument.
  • Jodi A. Barnes of American University • research on the historical archaeology of tenant farming in the Brown Mountain Creek area of the Blue Ridge Mountains.
  • Joshua Beatty of the College of William and Mary • research to develop a cultural history of the Stamp Act Crisis.
  • David A. Brown of the College of William and Mary • research on the changing landscapes of southeastern Chesapeake plantations, particularly the Fairfield plantation in Gloucester.
  • Kevin Butterfield of Washington University • research on Americans' proclivity for voluntary associations in the early to middle nineteenth century.
  • William J. Campbell of McMaster University • research on the varied interests of the parties involved in the 1768 Treaty at Fort Stanwix regarding land in the Ohio River Valley.
  • Benjamin L. Carp of the University of Edinburgh • research on the use of pyromachy during the Revolutionary War B its impact on military strategy, civilians' political allegiances, and the collective memory of the war.
  • Katherine Chilton of Carnegie Mellon University • research on the gender and labor relations of both free and enslaved African Americans in Richmond, comparing the dynamics before and after Emancipation.
  • Karen L. Cox of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte • research on Confederate culture from the late nineteenth century through World War II.
  • Wayne K. Durrill of the University of Cincinnati • research on Nat Turner and the Southampton Slave Insurrection.
  • Glenn T. Eskew of Georgia State University • research on jazz lyricist Johnny Mercer and jazz music in Virginia.
  • Ellen Eslinger of Depaul University • research on free black society in rural Virginia from the early to middle nineteenth century.
  • Kali N. Gross of Drexel University • research on the early life of Mary Hannah Tabbs, a native Virginian, who stood trial for committing a horrific and notorious murder in 1887 Philadelphia.
  • Gerardo Gurza-Lavalle of the Instituto Mora, Mexico City • research into a variety of early nineteenth century reform initiatives put forth in an effort to "modernize" Virginia slavery.
  • Uriel Heyd of Royal Holloway, University of London • research on the dynamics and "mental topography" of the eighteenth century press via a comparative examination of English and Colonial newspapers.
  • Warren R. Hofstra of Shenandoah University • a study of the wheat economy in the Shenandoah Valley.
  • Thomas J. Humphrey of Cleveland State University • research on the development and dynamics of land tenancy in Virginia during the Revolutionary era.
  • William P. Hustwit of the University of Mississippi • research on James J. Kilpatrick's life, role in the Civil Rights Movements, and views on segregation.
  • Charles F. Irons of Elon University • research on Virginia black evangelicals' influence on their white coreligionists in the nineteenth century.
  • Jeffrey Kosiorek of the University of Southern California • research on Revolutionary War commemoration in nineteenth-century America.
  • Angela M. Leonard of Loyola College in Maryland • research on the Virginia gravesites of enslaved people of African descent.
  • John G. McCurdy of Eastern Michigan University • research on the politics of bachelorhood in early America.
  • Gregory Mixon of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte • research on black southern militias in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia during the period 1865-1910.
  • Diane Mutti-Burke of the University of Missouri B Kansas City • research on Paulina and Thomas Stratton, slaveowners in Salem, Virginia who migrated to central Missouri, in preparation for the publication of Paulina Stratton's diary.
  • Elizabeth Pryor Minister Plenipotentiary and Senior Advisor to the U.S. Congress • research on Robert E. Lee's correspondence to investigate his attitudes toward slavery, his marriage, and his decision to fight for the Confederacy.
  • Justin Roberts of Johns Hopkins University • research on enslaved peoples' work regimes on Chesapeake plantations in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
  • Daniel Rood of the University of California at Irvine • research on the slave labor that drove antebellum southern ironworks and the ironworks' role in America's expanding international business interests.
  • J. L. Calvin Schermerhorn of the University of Virginia • research on how enslaved people in the Virginia Chesapeake resisted family disruption caused by slave trafficking in the antebellum period.
  • Yael A. Sternhell of Princeton University • research on the human mobility that rapidly accelerated in the South, particularly Virginia, during the Civil War.
  • Eric Taylor of the University of Pennsylvania • research on the relationship between historical memory and political struggle in Virginia from 1865 to 1902.
  • Joan-Maria Thomas-Andreu of the Universitat Rovira i Virgili • research on Alexander Weddell's ambassadorship to Spain and his role in U.S./Spain relations at the onset of World War II.
  • Robert E. Wright of New York University • research on holders of the U. S. national debt who registered their bonds in Virginia in the 1790s and early nineteenth century.

2005

2005

  • Tom Anderson of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte • research of political thought in Virginia during the American Revolution.
  • Nikki Berg of the University of Minnesota • research on female plantation , management in the old south.
  • Maria A. Bollettino of the University of Texas at Austin • a study of the influence of the Seven Years' War upon the issue of slavery in the British and French colonies.
  • Edward Bond of Alabama A &M University • research on James Blair (1656-1743).
  • William H. Boulware of the University of Cambridge • a study of the leisure habits of blacks and underclass whites in antebellum Georgia, South Carolina, and the Chesapeake region.
  • Glenn David Brasher of the University of Alabama • research on the participation of African Americans in the peninsula campaign of 1862.
  • Leslie Campbell of Hiram College • a study of black female culture in Virginia.
  • Kenneth Cohen of the University of Delaware • research on the making and meaning of leisure in early America.
  • Karen L. Cox of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte • a study of Confederate culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
  • Michael Creswell of Florida State University • research on France, the United States, and the Creation of the Cold War Order in Western Europe, 1945 to 1954.
  • Samuel Graber of the University of Iowa • a study of American memory after the Civil War.
  • John Wess Grant of Michigan State University • a comparative study of the free black communities of Richmond, Virginia and Monrovia, Liberia, between 1817 and 1870.
  • Warren R. Hofstra of Shenandoah University • a study of the wheat economy in the Shenandoah Valley.
  • James K. Hogue of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte • a study of black Confederates in history and memory.
  • Paul E. Johnson of the University of South Carolina • research on the first great American horse race.
  • Cynthia Kierner of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte • a biography of Martha Jefferson Randolph.
  • Daniel Krebs of Emory University • a study of German prisoners of war in the American Revolution.
  • Deborah Lee of the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities • research on the antislavery movement in northern Virginia, 1810-1865.
  • Angela M. Leonard of Loyola College in Maryland • research of African American gravesites in Virginia.
  • Jill McDonough • a book of sonnets concerning executions in American history.
  • Rebecca S. Montgomery of Mississippi State University • a biography of educational reformer Celeste Parrish.
  • Amy Morsman of Middlebury College • a study of Virginia planter families in the aftermath of the Civil War.
  • Lindsay O'Neill of Yale University • research on communication and community in the wider British world, 1660-1760.
  • Elizabeth Brown Pryor • research on a book of letters of Robert E. Lee.
  • Mark S. Quintanilla of Hannibal-LaGrange College • research on the letterbooks of Michael Keane.
  • Edward D. Ragan of Syracuse University • research on Rappahannock tribal oral traditions of elite assistance on Virginia's Middle Peninsula and Northern Neck.
  • Karen Rubin of Florida State University • a study of grief and loss among southern women in the aftermath of the Civil War.
  • John Ruddiman of Yale University • researching on young men of the continental army in Revolutionary War and peace."
  • John M. Sacher of Emporia State University • a study of Confederate conscription.
  • Laura Sandy of the University of Manchester • research on the role of overseers in the management of slave plantations in Virginia and South Carolina, 1740-1800."
  • Anne Secord of the University of Cambridge • research on the Dawson Turner papers.
  • Solomon Smith of the University of Georgia • research on industrial activities in the Chesapeake Region during the Eighteenth Century."
  • Diane Miller Sommerville of Fairleigh Dickinson University • research on suicide, gender, and the American Civil War.
  • Anthony J. Stanonis of the University of South Carolina • a study of leisure in southern beach communities.
  • Konrad Tuchscherer of St. John's University • research on Lott Cary and Augustus Curtis.
  • Tracey Weis of Millersville University • a study of the role of Virginians in the establishment of free black communities in south central Pennsylvania.
  • Heather A. Williams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • a study of African American family separation during slavery and reunification attempts.

2004

2004

  • Paul C. Anderson of Clemson University • research on a cultural history of the Shenandoah Valley.
  • Jacob Blosser of the University of South Carolina • research on the latitudinarianism and the Anglo-American mind."
  • Douglas M. Bradburn of the Newberry Library • research on opposition to the Alien and Sedition Acts.
  • Lauren H. Braun of the University of Illinois at Chicago • research on economic development and agricultural colonization in the U.S. South between 1884 and 1924.
  • Steven C. Bullock of Worchester Polytechnic Institute • research on culture, class, and power and provincial America, 1690-1760.
  • Leslie Campbell of Michigan State University • research on the black female material culture, 1916-1937.
  • Scott Casper of the University of Nevada, Reno • research on Sarah Johnson's Mount Vernon
  • Lynda L. Crist of The Papers of Jefferson Davis • research on a volume of the Papers of Jefferson Davis.
  • A. Glenn Crothers of Indiana University Southeast • research on Quaker communities in northern Virginia, 1750-1860.
  • John Davies of the University of Delaware • research connections between the Haitian Revolution and communities of African Americans in the United States.
  • Jose O. Diaz of The Ohio State University • research on imprisoned soldiers during the Civil War.
  • Brandon Dupont of the University of Kansas • research on the development of credit market institutions in the South following the Civil War.
  • Rebecca A. Goetz of Harvard University • research on religion and the construction of race in the Seventeenth-Century Chesapeake.
  • John Wess Grant of Michigan State University • research on Richmond, Virginia, and Monrovia, Liberia, Black Communities, 1817-1870.
  • Barbara Hahn of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • research on big business, small farms, and the creation of an agricultural commodity, 1830sB1930s.
  • Kimberly Harrison of Florida International University • research on rhetorics of Confederate Women's Civil War Diaries.
  • Kathleen M. Hilliard of the University of South Carolina • research on slaves' consumer activity in the antebellum South.
  • Reiko Hillyer of Columbia University • research on landscape, tourism, and memory in the new South, 1870-1930."
  • John G. Jacobsen of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln • research on U.S. Supreme Court Justice Philip Pendleton Barbour.
  • Caroline E. Janney of the University of Virginia • research on the role of white women in the celebration and creation of the Confederate past.
  • James C. Klotter of Georgetown College • research on Henry Clay and the American Presidency.
  • Michael A. LaCombe of New York University • research on food and authority in the English Atlantic World, 1570-1640.
  • Timothy Lockley of the University of Warwick • research on charity in the antebellum South.
  • Thomas Mackey of the University of Louisville • research on the legal culture among Civil War soldiers.
  • Aaron W. Marrs of the University of South Carolina • research on railroads in the antebellum South.
  • Rebecca Montgomery of Georgia Perimeter College • research on Celeste S. Parrish.
  • Kenneth W. Noe of Auburn University • research on the reasons behind enlistment in armies during the course of the Civil War.
  • Gregory E. O'Malley of Johns Hopkins University • research on the British Inter-Colony Trade in Slaves in the Long Eighteenth Century.
  • Eric W. Plaag of the University of South Carolina • research on how travels to the South during the antebellum era helped shape notions and create a national consciousness of the region.
  • Paul Quigley of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • research on the Evolution of Southern Nationalism, 1848-1865.
  • J. F. Saddler of Temple University • research on the American Episcopalians, 1780-1830.
  • Wendy St. Jean of Boston University • research on the Chickasaw Indians.
  • James J. Schaefer of the University of Toledo • research on the politics of cowardice during the Revolutionary Era, 1763-1783.
  • Beth Barton Schweiger of the University of Arkansas • research on reading slavery: literacy, virtue, and freedom in the early South.
  • Tristan Stubbs of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge • research on plantation overseers in the eighteenth-century South.
  • Michael Ayers Trotti of Ithaca College • research on sensationalism and cultural change in a southern city from the Victorian Era to the Age of Ragtime.
  • Maria Troyanovsky of Moscow State University • research on the ideological origins of American foreign policy.
  • François Weil of the Ecole des hautes etudes en sciences sociales • research on cultural history of genealogy in the United States.
  • Tomoko Yagyu of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • research on the slave trade in antebellum Richmond and Alexandria.
  • John Zaborney of the University of Maine at Presque Isle • research on slave hiring in antebellum Virginia.

2003

2003

  • Margaret Abruzzo of the University of Notre Dame • research on the role of changing perceptions of pain and suffering in moral evaluations of slavery in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
  • Austin Allen of the University of Houston – Downtown • research on imposing sovereignty, containing slavery: Jacksonian jurisprudence and the origins of the Dred Scott Case.
  • Paul Anderson of Clemson University • research on cultural history of the Shenandoah Valley.
  • Kevin Berland of Pennsylvania State University – Shenango • research on the new edition of William Byrd's Dividing Line histories.
  • Thomas Brown of the University of South Carolina • research on the civic monuments of the Civil War.
  • Steven Bullock of Worchester Polytechnic Institute • research on culture, class, and power in provincial America, 1690-1760.
  • Derek Catsam of Minnesota State University • research on the freedom rides in Virginia.
  • Matthew Clavin of American University • research on Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution in the American Civil War.
  • Frank Cogliano of the University of Edinburgh • research on interpretations of Thomas Jefferson in scholarship since the conclusion of the Second World War.
  • Benjamin Cohen of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University • research on the shared trends between environmental history and the history of chemistry in antebellum Virginia.
  • Christopher Curtis of the State University of West Georgia • research on the evolving legal and political ideas of land ownership in antebellum Virginia.
  • Kenneth Deitreich of West Virginia University • research on the relationship between ideas of masculinity in the antebellum United States and the coming of the American Civil War.
  • Jim Downs of Columbia University • research on medicine and health during Reconstruction.
  • Kenneth Fones-Wolf of West Virginia University • research on pro-Confederacy sentiments in the Wheeling region.
  • John Wess Grant of Michigan State University • research on aspects of the political and economic development of free black communities in Richmond, and Monrovia, Liberia.
  • Barbara Hahn of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • research on the establishment of the tobacco culture, 1865-1935.
  • Wallace Hettle of the University of Northern Iowa • research on Stonewall Jackson in memory and history.
  • Warren Hofstra of Shenandoah University • research on wheat in the Shenandoah Valley.
  • Caroline Janney-Lucas of the University of Virginia • research on the role of white women in the celebration and creation of the Confederate past.
  • Laura Croghan Kamoie of American University • research on the Business History of the Tayloe Family and the Virginia Gentry, 1700-1830.
  • Mitchell Kinsinger of Northwestern College • research on the struggle of Presbyterians for religious liberty in colonial America.
  • John Majewski of the University of California, Santa Barbara • research on economic policy and the origins of the Confederate State in Virginia and South Carolina.
  • Amy Minton of the University of Virginia • research on social relations in Richmond, Virginia, during the mid-nineteenth century.
  • Kathleen Murphy of Johns Hopkins University • research on texts in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic.
  • Alexis Pott of the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London • research on dress in Virginia, 1660-1740.
  • Paul Quigley of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • research on the evolution of southern nationalism, 1848-1865.
  • Lewie Reece of Anderson College • research on John S. Wise, the Republican Party in Virginia, and disenfranchisement.
  • James Rice of the State University of New York-Plattsburgh • research on Indians, colonists, and the Potomac River, 700 - 1800.
  • Kirsten Schultz of the University of Toronto • research on Confederate songsters.
  • Arwin Smallwood of Bradley University • research on the history of the Tuscarora Indians of the Iroquois Nation.
  • Terri Snyder of California State University – Fullerton • research on suicide in early America.
  • Rebecca Starr of the University of Gloucestershire • research on Virginia influences on the writings of Sophia Bledsoe Herrick, 1871-1877.
  • Scott Stephan of Ball State University • research on domestic devotion among whites in the antebellum South.
  • Konrad Tuchscherer of St. John's University • research on Lott Cary and Augustus Curtis.
  • Psyche Williams-Forson of McDaniel College • research on black female waiter carriers of Gordonsville, Virginia.
  • Tomoko Yagyu of the University of North Carolina • research on the slave trade in antebellum Richmond and Alexandria.
  • John Zaborney of the University of Maine at Presque Isle • research on slave hiring and white society in antebellum Virginia.
  • Natalie Zacek of the University of Manchester • research on the culture of politics and the politics of reputation in a colonial British American world.

2002

2002

  • Paul C. Anderson of Clemson University • research on the cultural history of the Shenandoah Valley.
  • Jacob Blosser of the University of South Carolina • research on latitudinarianism and the Anglo-American Mind.
  • Douglas M. Bradburn of the Newberry Library • research on opposition to the Alien and Sedition Acts.
  • Lauren H. Braun of the University of Illinois at Chicago • research on economic development and agricultural colonization in the U.S. South between 1884 and 1924.
  • Steven C. Bullock of Worchester Polytechnic Institute • research on politics of politeness: culture, class, and power and provincial America, 1690-1760.
  • Leslie Campbell of Michigan State University • research on black female material culture, 1916-1937.
  • Scott Casper of the University of Nevada, Reno • research on Sarah Johnson's Mount Vernon: African American life at an American shrine, from slavery to Jim Crow.
  • Lynda L. Crist of The Papers of Jefferson Davis • research on a volume of the Papers of Jefferson Davis.
  • A. Glenn Crothers of Indiana University Southeast • research on Quaker communities in northern Virginia, 1750-1860.
  • John Davies of the University of Delaware • research on connections between the Haitian Revolution and communities of African Americans in the United States.
  • Jose O. Diaz of The Ohio State University • research on imprisoned soldiers during the Civil War.
  • Brandon Dupont of the University of Kansas • research on the development of credit market institutions in the South following the Civil War.
  • Rebecca A. Goetz of Harvard University • research on the construction of race in the Seventeenth-Century Chesapeake.
  • John Wess Grant of Michigan State University • research on Richmond, Virginia, and Monrovia, Liberia, black communities, 1817-1870.
  • Barbara Hahn of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • research on big business, small farms, and the creation of an agricultural commodity, 1830s-1930s.
  • Kimberly Harrison of Florida International University • research on the book, the rhetorics of Confederate Women's Civil War Diaries.
  • Kathleen M. Hilliard of the University of South Carolina • research on consumer activity in the antebellum South.
  • Reiko Hillyer of Columbia University • research on landscape, tourism, and memory in the New South, 1870-1930.
  • John G. Jacobsen of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln • research on U.S. Supreme Court Justice Philip Pendleton Barbour.
  • Caroline E. Janney of the University of Virginia • research on the role of white women in the celebration and creation of the Confederate past.
  • James C. Klotter of Georgetown College • research on Henry Clay and the American Presidency.
  • Michael A. LaCombe of New York University • research on food and authority in the English Atlantic World, 1570-1640.
  • Timothy Lockley of the University of Warwick • research on charity in the antebellum South.
  • Thomas Mackey of the University of Louisville • research on the legal culture among Civil War Soldiers.
  • Aaron W. Marrs of the University of South Carolina • a study of railroads in the antebellum South.
  • Rebecca Montgomery of Georgia Perimeter College • research on Celeste S. Parrish.
  • Kenneth W. Noe of Auburn University • research on the reasons behind enlistment in armies during the course of the Civil War.
  • Gregory E. O'Malley of Johns Hopkins University • research on the British inter-colony trade in slaves in the long eighteenth century.
  • Eric W. Plaag of the University of South Carolina • research on how travels to the South during the antebellum era helped shape notions and create a national consciousness of the region.
  • Paul Quigley of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • research on the evolution of southern nationalism, 1848-1865.
  • J. F. Saddler of Temple University • research on American Episcopalians.
  • Wendy St. Jean of Boston University • research on the Chickasaw Indians.
  • James J. Schaefer of the University of Toledo • researching on the politics of cowardice during the Revolutionary Era, 1763-1783.
  • Beth Barton Schweiger of the University of Arkansas • research on slaveryeading Slavery: Literacy, Virtue, and Freedom in the Early South.
  • Tristan Stubbs of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge • research on plantation overseers in the eighteenth-century South.
  • Michael Ayers Trotti of Ithaca College • research on Sensationalism and Cultural Change in a Southern City from the Victorian Era to the Age of Ragtime.
  • Maria Troyanovsky of Moscow State University • research on the ideological origins of American foreign policy.
  • François Weil of the Ecole des hautes etudes en sciences sociales • research on the cultural history of genealogy in the United States.
  • Tomoko Yagyu of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • research on the slave trade in antebellum Richmond and Alexandria.
  • John Zaborney of the University of Maine at Presque Isle • research on slave hiring in antebellum Virginia.

2001

2001

  • Gretchen Adams of University of New Hampshire • research on the changing meaning of the Salem witchcraft trials in American history.
  • Dara Baker of Harvard University • research on how the developing ideas about citizenship during the antebellum period converged with the emerging two-party political system.
  • Susan Barber of College of Notre Dame of Maryland • research on the history of prostitution in Richmond, Virginia (1830–1880) and rape and sexual assault during the Civil War.
  • Patricia Brady of New Orleans, Louisiana • research on a biography of Martha Washington. Edwin Combs, University of Alabama • researching the nineteenth-century southern economy and the American Civil War.
  • Lynda Crist of Papers of Jefferson Davis • research on Volume 11 of the Papers of Jefferson Davis, which covers the last nine months of the Civil War
  • Brian Daugherity of College of William and Mary • research on the role of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in the struggle over school desegregation in Virginia in the 1950s and 1960s
  • Rand Dotson of Louisiana State University • research on the history of Roanoke, Virginia, from 1880 to 1930.
  • K. R. Constantine Gutzman of John Jay College, CUNY • research on Jeffersonian Republican hegemony in Virginia after 1800 and the contemporary Virginia opinion of John Marshall's tenure as chief justice of the United States.
  • Daniel Kilbride of John Carroll University • research on Americans visiting Europe from 1790 to 1870.
  • Annette Laing of Georgia Southern University • research on transatlantic personal relationships and identity in the age of the American Revolution.
  • Diana Laulainen-Schein of University of Minnesota • research on witchcraft in early modern England and the colonial Chesapeake.
  • Deborah Lee of George Mason University • research on Ann Randolph Meade Page and the role of women in the antislavery movement in the Upper South.
  • Randy Lichtenberger of Thomas Jefferson's Poplar Forest • research on early nineteenth-century Virginia diaries.
  • Hilary Moss Brandeis University • research on African American education in the North and Upper South prior to the Civil War.
  • Karen O'Brien of Northwestern University • research on religion, obligation, and identity in the American Revolution.
  • Victoria Ott of University of Tennessee, Knoxville • research on young elite women in the Civil War and Reconstruction South, 1861–1877.
  • Jason Phillips of Rice University • research on how southerners handled defeat following the Civil War.
  • James Rice of Plattsburgh State University of New York • research on Indians, colonists, and environments in the Potomac Basin, 700–1850.
  • Honor Sachs of University of Wisconsin-Madison • research on gender and politics in the eighteenthcentury Kentucky backcountry.
  • Nancy Schurr of University of Tennessee, Knoxville • research on Confederate hospitals during the Civil War.
  • Thomas Schwartz of Vanderbilt University • research on the foreign policy of the Lyndon Johnson Administration toward Europe.
  • Aaron Sheehan-Dean of University of Virginia • research on Virginia soldiers before and during the Civil War.
  • Werner Steger of Dutchess Community College, SUNY • research on the formation of political and social identity among artisans and immigrants in Richmond, Virginia, 1847-1865.
  • Joanne Thomas of Western Michigan University, • research on Civil War music.
  • Moshe Usadi of University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill • research on William H. Holcombe.
  • LeeAnn Whites of University of Missouri-Columbia • research on the Minor family.
  • Susan Williams of Oakland, California • research on the Civil War photography of Andrew J. Russell.

2000

2000

  • Ann Alexander of Mary Baldwin College • research on John S. Wise and fictional representations of Reconstruction
  • Dara Baker of Harvard University • research on how the developing ideas about citizenship during the antebellum period converged with the emerging two-party political system
  • Edward Baptist of University of Miami • research on enslaved African Americans forcibly moved to the frontiers of the plantation South between 1790 and 1860
  • Edward Bond of Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University • research on the life and times of James Blair, Virginia's commissary (or representative of the Bishop of London) from 1689 until his death in 1743
  • Robert Bonner of Michigan State University • research on nationality in the slaveholding South
  • Peter Bridges of Arlington, Va • research on a biography of John Moncure Daniel
  • Andrew Burstein of University of Northern Iowa • research on the ambition of William Wirt
  • Ronald Butchart of University of Georgia • research on the freedmen's teachers in Virginia, 1861-1875
  • Evelyn Causey of University of Delaware • research on the experiences of southern men in colleges and universities between 1820 and 1860
  • Chris Curtis of Emory University • research on ideas of property in nineteenth-century Virginia
  • Christopher Fennell of University of Virginia • research on regional analysis of historical processes which shaped the pace of development in northern Virginia in the late eighteenth to mid nineteenth centuries
  • Sarah Hand of University of Virginia • research on alcohol, race and gender in early Virginia
  • Alec Haskell of John Hopkins University • research on the reputation and the nature of public authority in Colonial Virginia
  • Warren Hofstra of Shenandoah University • research on the consequences of British policy and European settlement for the cultural landscape and economic geography of the eighteenth-century Virginia frontier
  • Odai Johnson of University of Washington • research on the "Colonial American Stage"
  • Julia King of Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory • research on the landscape and the use of history in 19th Century Virginia: identifying the Jamestown Pilgrims, 1798-1865
  • Sarah Lawrence of Pennsylvania State University • research on the birth control movement among rural African Americans in Virginia
  • Ann Smart Martin of University of Wisconsin-Madison • research on women's lives in eighteenth and early nineteenth century Virginia -- a study of consumerism and the retail trade in backcountry Virginia, 1760-1820
  • Maurice Melton of Andrew College • research on the Confederacy's military industry, 1861-1865
  • J. Tracy Power of South Carolina Department of Archives and History • research on George Washington Custis Lee
  • Kirby Randolph of University of Pennsylvania • research on African Americans and mental illness
  • James Rice of State University of New York-Plattsburgh • research on wars, migrations, and the frontier origins of American Culture, 1000-1850
  • Terri Snyder of California State University, Fullerton • research on women and political culture in Virginia, 1720-1830
  • Janice Stennette of East Carolina University • research on labor contracts between freedmen and southerners in Virginia, 1865-1870
  • Linda Sturtz of Beloit College • research on women, property, and power in Colonial Virginia"
  • JoAnne Thomas of Western Michigan University • research on songs of the Civil War
  • Michael Trotti of lthaca College • research on the Jim Crow Richmond
  • Camille Wells of University of Virginia • research on Menokin -- domestic architecture and genteel housing in early Virginia
  • Cheryl Wells of University of South Carolina • research on the effect of time and temporal consciousness on the American Civil War and its participants
  • John Wigger of University of Missouri-Columbia • research on Francis Asbury, leader of the Methodist movement in America from the 1770's until his death in 1816
  • Susan Williams of Oakland, Cal. • research on Civil War photographs taken by Andrew J. Russell in Richmond and Petersburg, April to June 1865

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