"In the Beginning, all America was Virginia."
William Byrd II
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Learning History from a Charred Corn Cob
In this video, Program Coordinator Chris Van Tassell discusses a charred piece of corn in the Virginia Historical Society's long-term exhibition "The Story of Virginia, an American Experience."
“Carte de la Virginie,” Pierre Duval, Ma Enter Fullscreen More information
“Carte de la Virginie,” Pierre Duval, Ma
“Carte de la Virginie,” Pierre Duval, Map E171 1682:1 Throughout the colonial era, Europeans knew little about the extent of North America.
“A Chief Lady of Pomeiooc,” by Theodore de Bry after John White Enter Fullscreen More information
“A Chief Lady of Pomeiooc,” by Theodore de Bry after John White
“A Chief Lady of Pomeiooc,” by Theodore de Bry after John White, an English artist and cartographer, 1590, 2000.100.2 White drew some of the earliest images of the Native Americans of the region that became Virginia
Clovis Point, about 9500 BCE Enter Fullscreen More information
Clovis Point, about 9500 BCE
Clovis Point, about 9500 BCE Paleo-Indians quarried chert, chalcedony, and jasper to make Clovis points. These stones were used as the tips of projectiles and as knife blades. Clovis Points are named after the New Mexico site where they were first discovered. (Courtesy of the Department of Historic Resources)
Grinding Stone, about 4000 BCE Enter Fullscreen More information
Grinding Stone, about 4000 BCE
Grinding Stone, about 4000 BCE Grinding stones made nuts and seeds more edible, but it introduced bits of stone into the food. The chewing of gritty meal wore down peoples’ teeth. (Courtesy of the Department of Historic Resources)
Steatite Bowl, about 2000 BCE   Enter Fullscreen More information
Steatite Bowl, about 2000 BCE
Steatite Bowl, about 2000 BCE Steatite, or soapstone, could be easily carved to make cooking bowls. Its use suggests that people were more settled, because the bowls were heavy and difficult to move. (Courtesy of the Department of Historic Resources)
Charred Corncob, about 1000 Enter Fullscreen More information
Charred Corncob, about 1000
Charred Corncob, about 1000 When corn made its way to Virginia from Mexico, around 1000, cultivating cultures settled more permanently. (Courtesy of the Department of Historic Resources)
Woodland Hoe Blade, about 1500 Enter Fullscreen More information
Woodland Hoe Blade, about 1500
Woodland Hoe Blade, about 1500 The hoe—used to till or turn over the soil in farming—allowed the cultivation of large quantities of food to support growing populations. (Courtesy of the Department of Historic Resources)
Stone Pipe, about 1500 Enter Fullscreen More information
Stone Pipe, about 1500
Stone Pipe, about 1500 A non-food crop, tobacco was important in social rituals and religious ceremonies. Pipes were often made from stone as well as clay. (Courtesy of the Department of Historic Resources)
Bola, about 1500 Enter Fullscreen More information
Bola, about 1500
Bola, about 1500 A bola consists of two heavy stone balls attached with a strong cord. It was swung and hurled at waterfowl that became entangled as the bola wrapped around them. (Courtesy of the Department of Historic Resources)
Ceramic Bowl, about 1000 Enter Fullscreen More information
Ceramic Bowl, about 1000
Ceramic Bowl, about 1000 Pottery was crafted by women who pinched together coils of clay dug from riverbanks to form the walls, and used paddles wrapped with cord or net to shape the exterior. (Courtesy of the Department of Historic Resources)
Learning History from a Charred Corn Cob
“Carte de la Virginie,” Pierre Duval, Ma
“Carte de la Virginie,” Pierre Duval, Ma
“A Chief Lady of Pomeiooc,” by Theodore de Bry after John White
“A Chief Lady of Pomeiooc,” by Theodore de
Clovis Point, about 9500 BCE
Clovis Point, about 9500 BCE
Grinding Stone, about 4000 BCE
Grinding Stone, about 4000 BCE
Steatite Bowl, about 2000 BCE
Steatite Bowl, about 2000 BCE
Charred Corncob, about 1000
Charred Corncob, about 1000
Woodland Hoe Blade, about 1500
Woodland Hoe Blade, about 1500
Stone Pipe, about 1500
Stone Pipe, about 1500
Bola, about 1500
Bola, about 1500
Ceramic Bowl, about 1000
Ceramic Bowl, about 1000